The Contemporary Stone Sculpture Movement of Zimbabwe and its origin

In Zimbabwe, the Shona people were traditionally known as “the People of the Mist”, since they inhabited the mist-shrouded Inyanga Mountains, from whose stone their descendants have been creating extraordinary sculpture over the past century or so. The Shona are the oldest and also the largest ethnic group in the country, and the legendary guardians…

History of the Tengenenge Sculpture Community and how Bloemfield wanted to keep it in the dark ages

Tom Bloemfield is eulogized for having ‘persuaded’ his farm workers to, “try their hand at sculpture” purely for altruistic reasons; out of concern for their livelihoods and after he became aware of a huge deposit of black serpentine (rock) situated on a hill on his farm. This, however, is a fallacy. His farm workers were…

A Groundbreaking Congress in Zimbabwe

The International Congress for African Culture (ICAC) brought scores of international art practitioners and scholars to Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1962 to discuss the global influence of art from Africa. Despite taking place in a still colonized territory, the event went on to change the course of the arts on the African continent. However,…

60 years of promoting visual art

The National Gallery of Zimbabwe has hosted about 1 000 exhibitions since its inauguration in July 1957. The first ever exhibition showcased at the Gallery was an enormous undertaking, involving the loan of many art objects from around the world, with most of the work coming from some of the world’s most prestigious galleries and…

National Gallery of Zimbabwe marks 60 years of art

At the Gallery Officially opened in July 1957 the National Gallery of Zimbabwe quickly became a force to be reckoned with as it was renowned for being the best Gallery building in the world. The opening was broadcast by the BBC and a total of 181 press reports on the Gallery appeared in local and…

A Quick History of Zimbabwean Shona Sculpture

By Robert Mukondiwa Curator (Zim Art) African stone sculpture from Zimbabwe is often called Shona sculpture, named after the largest tribe engaged in sculpting. Zimbabwe – derived from the Shona word dzimbadzamabwe which means ‘house of stone’ – is the only country on the African continent that has large deposits of stone suitable for sculpting.

Pablo Picasso And The Influence Of Zimbabwe Stone Sculpture

Today, Picasso art-works seem to have transcended time as his works continue to be some of the most sought after pieces in the world by both collectors and investors. A little known fact until recently, was where Picasso garnered some of his inspiration. It may come as a surprise, but Picasso was most certainly influenced…